Welcome back to my site…I hope you’ve enjoyed this quick series on jazz rhythm solfege! If this is your first time visiting this site, please feel free to browse around and check out previous posts or go to my Digital Store¬†today where you’ll find great resources that will help you unlock your potential in improvisation and rhythm!

In this 2nd part of this series I wanted to give you more examples of how we can apply part 1’s solfege syllables/words to your jazz rhythms. This is simply an exercise that will help solidify your jazz rhythm time, phrasing and articulation. Check out last week’s post to get the general rules on how to apply the syllables.

Below are a few more examples of using that system. The first is a string of eighth notes that are tied in the center. Note the end of the first group uses Dah while the end of the phrase has Daht.

The next example shows the use of the syllables with the triplet as well as the end of the phrase that should NOT use the syllable Daht.

The next example shows an off-beat quarter note (which requires a Daht) and a dotted-quarter (anything longer then a quarter should use Dah or Doo).

The final example shows what you would use over sixteenths and sixteenth-note triplets.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this tip and series and that it has added value and benefit to your playing or teaching. I know the examples above didn’t cover every rhythm known to man, but I hope that it gives you a plan to implement. As I mentioned in last week’s post: if you have ways or tips that you use for jazz rhythm solfege-please feel free to comment and give your suggestion(s). We’re here to help each other!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Leave a Reply