Jason Klobnak Joins the B.A.C. Family!

Klobnak Joins B.A.C.

Klobnak Joins B.A.C.

I am absolutely thrilled, honored, and incredibly excited to share that I am now an endorsing artist for the B.A.C. (Best American Craftsman) company based out of Kansas City, MO (USA)! Mike Corrigan and the staff at B.A.C. do an amazing job creating some of the best brass instruments in the world. Everything is done in their shop in Kansas City and is handmade with the finest craftsmanship and detail.

I met Mike and a few of his staff at NAMM 2017 (National Association of Music Merchants) in Anaheim, California in January. It didn’t take long for me to fall in love with just about every trumpet they had at their booth. I was the guy that kept trying their trumpets, went away and tried others, and then kept coming back like a lost puppy. After some conversation in Anaheim and later over the phone; I officially joined the family! It is an honor to be on the same roster as great musicians like Delfeayo Marsalis, Kenny Rampton, Kevin Williams, Jim Pugh, Michael Ray, Paul Nowell, Marcus Lewis, and a host of others.

Be sure to check out B.A.C’s website at CoolIsBac

To see Jason’s other Endorsements click Here.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Jason Klobnak Joins the Denis Wick Family!

Klobnak Joins Denis Wick

Klobnak Joins Denis Wick

Klobnak joins the Denis Wick family! I am absolutely thrilled, honored, and incredibly excited to share that I am now an endorsing artist! Denis Wick (London) makes some of the best mouthpieces, mutes, and accessories for brass players around. While I have been performing and recording with the Denis Wick adjustable cup mute for almost 20 years, I have never had the opportunity to really check out their mouthpieces until January of 2017.

I met Mary and a few other Wick artists at NAMM 2017 (National Association of Music Merchants) in Anaheim, California in January. I had the pleasure of trying out a few of their mouthpieces and there was an instant comfort, yet familiarity that I fell in love with. I have made the switch over to the American Classic 3C (and Classic 3E when I need something a little brighter) and they keep surprising me every time I put them in my trumpet. I can color the sound, yet still have the comfort and endurance to make it through an entire night of R&B/Soul music without feeling shot the next day. I would gladly recommend any of the fine Denis Wick products to students and colleagues.

So, I have officially joined the family! It is an honor to be on the same roster as so many great musicians that perform all types of brass instruments.
Be sure to check out Denis Wick’s North American site at DANSR.COM

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Jason Klobnak Joins the Westone Family

I’m incredibly excited to share that I am officially joining the Westone family! While the in-ear monitor and hearing protection community is familiar with them (you should check out their artist roster-it’s a “who’s who” of the musician world), this is from their About Us section on their website:

Established in 1959, Westone Laboratories has more than 55 years of experience delivering premium in-ear solutions for critical listening applications. Westone is the largest manufacturer of custom ear pieces in the world and was the first to design and manufacture a balanced armature driver earphone. With hearing healthcare and music specialists on our research and production teams, Westone invented the most ergonomic monitor design which provides the most comfortable, best fitting and quietest earphones on the market. The largest names in music turn to Westone in-ear monitors for on-stage use, just as U.S. Air Force fighter pilots depend on Westone’s ACCES® in-ear communications system for mission-critical noise isolation, hearing protection and two-way communication. It is our experience, our products, and our people that make Westone The In-Ear Experts®.

I’m a proud user of the Tru Customs and the ES20 custom in-ears (both pictured below). The Tru Customs are perfect for everything I play from small group Jazz (especially in a loud room) to louder amplified bands where the sound team doesn’t have capability to run a line for my ES20‘s.

I have the size 20 filters which reduces overall down to 13dB. If I ever want to raise or lower that filtration I can get different filters that range from 25 down to 10. The ES20‘s are AMAZING. When I went to get the molds, my rep didn’t try to up-sell me to something I didn’t need. The ES20‘s are a dual-driver system. The clarity is exceptional and the fit is spot on. I really love their Flex Canal technology. A body temperature-reactive, semisoft earpiece canal additive that stays firm at room temperature for ease of insertion and then softens at body temperature, allowing increased comfort and acoustic seal for incredible noise isolation.

I would highly recommend that you check out Westone for your hearing protection and IEM’s. Not just because I’m officially an endorsing artist now, but because the products and service are worth it!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Hark the Herald

Hark the Herald

Hark the Herald

 

I’m excited to share that my new single Hark the Herald is available!

For those familiar with my work with the JKQ, this is going to be slightly different. I wanted to do something creative with other musicians I often perform with in the Denver area. Imagine your favorite Christmas carol of Hark the Herald Angels Sing and mixing it with a little of my flavor, a little Snarky Puppy, and a little gospel. I know you’re going to enjoy it!

Jason Klobnak-trumpet/flugelhorn

Jason “J-Rob” Roberson-keys/drums

Nathaniel Kearney Jr.-bass

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

New Chapter

New Chapter

New Chapter

New Chapter Artwork & Liner Notes

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Best Recordings of 2013 List

mountain move

220x220 Album CoverI am very honored and humbled to share this exciting news with you today. Mountain, Move made the list of Best Recordings of 2013 by C. Michael Bailey at All About Jazz today! There are a number of good albums that made this list and am proud to see Mountain, Move on there. Thank you again to all who supported the album during its production and for those that have purchased it since its release.

If you have not grabbed your copy yet, get one today to find out why it made the list!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Lick of the Day

Yesterday (Jan. 3rd, 2013) I added a new feature to my website called the Lick of the Day. Jazz improvisation has been compared to speech by many great jazz educators. Much like speaking; Jazz has words, phrases and sentences that we can put together to make a cohesive musical statement. To be a better communicator- you need to have more then just a few words in your vocabulary.

There’s a number of different ways you can add to your vocabulary:

  • In my opinion, the best way is to grab them from recordings or live performances. The licks, lines, phrases, etc. that move and excite you should be the ones you learn (and learn them in all keys). Then find creative ways to put that line into different harmonic situations.
  • Talk with other musicians about their favorite lines. You never know when someone else’s favorite lines might work for your vocabulary. This is one of the reasons I started the Lick of the Day. These “licks” are lines that I enjoy using or heard being played.
  • Lick and/or Pattern Books. I don’t have any issue with lick or pattern books per se. If you can grab some that work for you…great. Most lick or pattern books I’ve read, however, were pretty stale. There have been a few that I’ve enjoyed, but not many. Maybe the licks really moved the author, but I didn’t find too many that moved me.

My goal with the Lick of the Day is to provide you with some motivation to add to your vocabulary. If you like the lick you see on a particular day I encourage you to internalize it and learn it in all keys. Find creative ways to put it into other harmonic situations. If you don’t like the lick on a particular day…that’s fine too! Check back daily and you might find one that grabs your attention.

Thank you for taking the time to read this blog/post. As a thank you I wanted to give you a FREE MP3 from the JKQ. Simply click the button below and fill out the short form and you’ll have it in just a few short moments!

mp3

SaveSave

Improv Tip Week # 49-Shapes AND Malaria Fundraiser Day 1

Welcome everyone to Week #49 AND Day 1 of JKM’s Fundraiser to eradicate Malaria! Did you know that Malaria is 100% preventable? Yet, Malaria kills over one million people each year; 85% of those are children under the age of 5. Today, tomorrow and Wednesday 100% of all Targeting: Improvisation With Purpose book sales, booked Skype Lessons or clinics (they can be for later dates) will be going to help eradicating Malaria by purchasing bed nets for children.

We will be teaming up with HappyBirthdayNate.com and World Vision to do our part in making sure children’s lives are spared from Malaria. If you would like to donate without purchasing a book or scheduling a lesson/clinic, you can go directly to the site above to donate. Otherwise, you can go directly to our Digital Store to make your purchase or to schedule a Skype lesson or Clinic.

In this week’s tip (week #49), we’re going to look at taking a lick and using that lick’s shape to create new ideas. There are times when I’m improvising that I like to think about the shapes of the lines I’m playing. I’ve talked to a number of guitarists and pianists who prefer to think of shapes when they improvise because it’s conducive to their instrument. I think every instrumentalist can apply this concept. To start out, let’s take a look at one of the most common licks found in jazz: the “Cry Me A River” lick (or CMAR).

We’ve talked about using licks in other harmonic situations in past week’s, but this time let’s look at the overall shape of the line without any stems or rhythms:

The above graphic gives you a very good idea of the shape of the line. Now, let’s take a look at it without any sharps or flats and truly the shape of the line:

Now we can apply that shape to whatever rhythm or note length value we like to create a new line based on the original shape. The example below is taking the notes verbatim from the example below, but changing up the rhythm. I’m listening to a heavy shuffle tune now so I made this example with the intent of it fitting over that groove. This example could be played over a number of different harmonies:

The next example stems off of the same idea above, but combines it with the notes from the original riff. Note how we now have a completely different line then the original lick yet they’re still related:

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s tip and have found it useful to your playing! Please feel free to share this tip and site with your friends, students, colleagues or other sites that you’re a contributor. Also, please share what we’re doing with HappyBirthdayNate.com even beyond our fundraiser period. They’re raising awareness and funds through October 2012. Let’s continue to do our part to help those in need.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave